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Thread: Tire considerations for multi season travel

  1. #11
    OLC Member cruiserpilot's Avatar
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    What are you driving? Is it a pick up with nothing in the box? I just finished driving my Land Cruiser over 8000 kms from Vr Isl to Inuvik and back, it was full blown
    winter on the passes through to Inuvik. I also did the N Canol for a few days and it was wet slush and mud. I was fully loaded, which aids in traction a lot.
    I use Toyo MT's 285/75R17 that I have siped down the center blocks. Siping a mud tire will improve it's ice/rain/slush handling characteristics considerably.
    I won't buy any other tires for my truck. I've driven them over Rodgers Pass in winter and through the border area when it is really icy and the siping has
    been the difference to control.

  2. #12
    OLC Member Lucky j's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by condorman View Post
    thanks for the reply!
    As far as going with a full blown winter tire, I live out of town in a cabin on a 23km double track unserviced road and work in remote field locations where my rig is the only way to get my gear close to the site. So having a highway type winter tire is not really an option for me. still have to be able to move over mud, ice, slush, water, and snow.
    the reason I pointed toward winter tire was because you mentionned Ice driving, and your location is the yukon. So I assume that it is winter about 8 months out of the year. But I might be wrong.

    and the reason I mentionned that type of tire is aslo based on experience. I remember a few years back, we were wheeling our last trail in mid november here in the province of quebec. About a foot of snow on the ground. Later than that, just to much snow, but for track vehicule off plowed road. So, some of us were on winter tire, some of us on mud. Who was going further, the winter tire. When a little spinning would occure, the mud tires would simply well, spin on a thin sheet of ice. The winter one, would not even reach the spin, or would keep on going foward. November was snow, but also mud and slushy mud. Ans we were mostly running the no name winter type at 100,00$ a tire. But that was 15" and more than 15 yrs ago.

    few years later, winter tires are now mandotory by law here in quebec. But me jeep is on snow duty at my cabin, and does not hit the road at all, so I do not realy put winter tire on it.

    But I did for a while got my self a set of used bf at with the snow flake/mountain logo on the side, they would be good in traction for about one year cycle, like two summer and one winter. More that that, not enough tread remaining for the coumpond to be soft enought when weather was in the -20 and lower. Even when new, the -20 and less was sliperry.

    but if you decide to go with the more muddy type, I suggest going with the type you will find the snow flake/mountain logo on the side, witch in your choice should be the bf at, and the goodyear duratrack. I would add into that, the pro-comp at I believe have the snowflake/mountain.

    The logo make them certified that the rubber will not freeze in the negative temperature as oposed to regular mud and 4 season or regulase m+s (all season) tire.

    my 0,02$.

  3. #13
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    Thanks for all the reply!

    Up here we get a ton of snow, the snow pack gets crispy during the day and then wind blown wish fresh snow on top in the evenings. Our blow service on the highways is incredible, they are laser aligned and computer controlled trucks that fly by at nearly 100kms (sparks and snow flying very far). I run a 2006 jeep Tj with no rear seats and a 3" lift. We are required this year to have snow flake rated tires at minimum, most cars run studs but few trucks do so. I drive mostly city except my 20 minute commute once i reach the road from my access road. we don't have a plow and most roads i use for field work are not serviced at all from November to May. That said, Mud tires have served me fairly well except on glare ice in parking lots. I have considered running studs in the winter but have opted out based on my need to access areas covered in deep snow and overflow on frozen lakes.
    I have come to the conclusion based on your inputs and the absolutely ridiculous amount of research i have dug up on A/T tires, that the new BFG A/T KO2 in a 33x10.50R15 is the best bet in my situation. The snowflake logo is present, they have a more aggressive side wall and apparently are much better in the tread wear department than the previous KOs. The have been ordered and will soon be installed (in a few weeks as our Kaltire is absolutely Swamped!! due to our first massive snowfall and negative teen temps occurring over the weekend)

    I wish most companies would pick up on the need for tires in more "out dated" sizes and rim diameters.

    Thanks all for your experiences and $0.02 on the matter.



    ** REVIEWS TO COME! **
    Last edited by condorman; 11-03-2015 at 12:00 AM.

  4. #14
    OLC Member Lucky j's Avatar
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    I think you will not be desapointed. I to am not a real beleiver in studed tire when good rubber only tire are available. Plus the fact that you will neve be able to use studeed tire in summer to finished them up. Here, they have to be removed by mid march I think.

    Just be carefull on the ice and very hard pack in extreme cold temperature until you get used to them.

    And yes, keep us posted. And 33x10.5 should be fun in the snow.
    Last edited by Lucky j; 11-03-2015 at 05:10 PM.

  5. #15
    OLC Member MatS's Avatar
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    Sounds like a good call. Hope you enjoy them and get a good trouble free run out of them.

    Don't expect to see many places picking up on the older sizes, as cars get safer and brakes get bigger the minimum required wheel size goes up. Minimum wheel sizes on new trucks is 17" now so the tall skinny 15s are a thing of the past. Even at VW we have clearance issues with 15" alloys on some of our newer small cars, in most cases steelies are thinner so they still sneak on.

  6. #16
    OLC Member uriedog's Avatar
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    Interested to hear how you like the KO2's in the ice and cold. They will likely be my next tire on the Dodge .

  7. #17
    Moderator/OLC Vendor MillwrightMike's Avatar
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    Also interested in the KO2's as the tread life is not as good with the Duratracs but their winter performance has been rated well above the BFG. Have the changed anything besides the sidewall on the KO2 ?
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  8. #18
    OLC Member MatS's Avatar
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    Minor change in the tread pattern from what I could see when I tossed them on. The sidewall was the best improvement though I could see because it added a lot more protection to the most vulnerable part of the sidewall especially when the tires were aired down and bulged out. BFG website but say something about compound or structure change but my xray vision doesn't work anymore for that lol

  9. #19
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    Well,

    My BFG KO2 tires have arrived in town. but due to our late winter snowfall and the insane back log of people scrambling to have winter tires put on by the two trusted shops in town.. I have been put on the wait roster. I should have them mounted before the end of November haha. The jeep needing tires quite badly leaving it parked in the yard until the roads improve. The delay has however, given me the time and push to install my 7" round sealed HID projector headlights to replace my 7' round factory halogens (one of which was demolished in relation to my recent adventure into the ditch) and to assess my need for a rear camp/work light, as well as a light option under the hood (factory one was smashed off soon after purchase)

    I Should have the tires just before my upcoming trip to the arctic circle on the Dempster Hwy in search of a caribou to bring home with me, so i will have an abused based review right quick.

    Does anyone have any advise into the tire pressure range that I should be using when aired down? I run between 25-28 psi for highway driving (depending on how much I am carrying) and have run between 12-15 psi aired down in the past, but noticed little gains in traction with my Procomp MT2s. I fear losing the bead at lower pressures on the mixed terrain I frequently face. *I do run onboard air, if that changes opinions at all*

    Cheers
    Last edited by condorman; 11-10-2015 at 02:19 AM.

  10. #20
    OLC Member Lucky j's Avatar
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    What is the final dimension of the tire you have purchased, and what is the tire width of the rim you are running?

    a wider tire on a narrower rim allows for les tire pressure.

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