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Thread: Etiquette: Garbage

  1. #1
    Moderator Jeremy's Avatar
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    Default Etiquette: Garbage

    Remember to always pack out what you take in. If you come upon a mess left by others take out or clean up what you can. Everyone hates getting to to an amazing spot only to find trash/shotgun shells/tents and other garbage left from inconsiderate campers before.

    I recommend getting a box of Contractor garbage bags, they are thick walled and large for just such clean ups. If you cant pack it out then try and make it better for your self and others who come after. I do not blame you for not wanting to truck out a bag of disgusting trash left by others in the back of your SUV. But if its bagged up and ready to go maybe the next group will have a Pick Up or a roof rack for just such things.

    When camping and taking beer with you try and find your choice of beer in cans and not bottles. So many back country areas are littered with broken bottles. I will admit that beer does taste better out of a bottle but they are heavy and bulky when empty. Cans can be crushed and are light, taking up very little space and requiring minimal effort.

    Do not try and burn your cans (food and beer) or bottles. It leaves a mess and really does no one any good.

    I should not have to say this to any one but ever get to a great camp area and find TP piles all over the place? Well do not pick them up, there is fiches or other under it. If you need to crap in the bush dig a hole.
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  2. #2
    OLC Member qcdavid's Avatar
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    Try to leave your site just as good or better than you found it. I like to whittle sticks around the fire but it leaves a mess of shavings. I pick up the shavings and throw them in the fire. I'll use a branch to rake up where we've made too many tracks so that it looks clean for the next people.

    Oh, and in regards to garbage, please do not use the fire pit as a garbage can. Not everything burns and there's nothing more disgusting than finding a fire pit full of bottle caps, cans, half burned boxes of cereals, etc... Especially if you're going to cook over the fire, it's not too appealing if the previous tenants used it to burn their garbage. Like Jeremy said, pack it out. Nowadays garbage cans are fairly easy to find.

  3. #3
    OLC Member klahanie's Avatar
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    Years ago I used to 'wheel around Harrison Lake area, checking out old camps and logging roads. Two memories have stuck with me from that time: first, the old camps were always a mess: derelict housing with exposed insulation and disemboweled mattresses, old equipment, tires, broken glass you name it. Second, and this I've never been able to figure out, it seemed everyone and his dog was changing their oil out in the bush. Because every other clearing on a logging spur had empty lubricant containers strewn about (well, some were the alcoholic kind) and often there were fuel/oil stains on the ground.

    Fast forward to today (way too fast!) and a trip we just had to the Kootenays; marked by a noticeable lack of garbage both industrial and recreational. Every bush camp spot was neat and tidy even those obviously used by hunters - that oft maligned group. Sadly that's in contrast to a trip we took to the Northern part of another province marred as it was by maddeningly unnecessary litter. Not to denigrate another part of this country, but I'm a proud BC boy and I believe in giving credit where credit is due.

    So here's a cheer to industry (or maybe to the excavator operator), a cheer to recreational users (the vast majority of them), and a cheer to those who pick up after others. Yes some may be paid to do so but a very special thanks goes to those who stop and pick up - not - because it's their ratty old tee shirt or for the 5 cent deposit but because it's THEIR (OUR) country and if they have to clean it up they darn well will.

    Thank you for making a difference !



  4. #4
    OLC Member JeepGSD's Avatar
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    Great reminder Jeremy and cheers to you klahanie!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by klahanie View Post
    Second, and this I've never been able to figure out, it seemed everyone and his dog was changing their oil out in the bush. Because every other clearing on a logging spur had empty lubricant containers strewn about (well, some were the alcoholic kind) and often there were fuel/oil stains on the ground.



    I remember taking the oil out of Dear Old Dads truck in the early 80`s and tipping it in a pit in the back yard on his direction.


    I think the advent of the oil recycling depot or telling retailers like Canadian Tire to take oil in return is a relatively recent thing. Add to that there is now a market for used oil and people tipping out in the bush seems to drop off...

  6. #6
    OLC Member Snowwalker's Avatar
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    Hey Jeremy and group. Just want to suggest a thing about food cans. If you are packing them out we all know to crush them right? But the small amounts of food left in them can start to smell pretty bad to us but "GREAT" to bears. I suggest that you wash your cans just like you do the dishes before you crush and throw into a trash bag.
    There is also the practice of burning food scraps out in the fire and then bagging, but with cans being lined with a plastic coating I am not too sure about that.

  7. #7
    OLC Member Lucky j's Avatar
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    And I would add that if you decide to clean them, recycling those metal and plastic container does not take more space than garbage.

    si you will reduce the amount of real garbage you have.

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