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Thread: Cargo Security System Build

  1. #1
    OLC Member R_Lefebvre's Avatar
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    Default Cargo Security System Build

    Well, I might as well post up my setup since it's nearing completion. I put a lot of thought into this, weighed the pros and cons of different systems and ideas from other people to come up with what I think will work best for me. The original idea was to create a proper cargo barrier with a shelf for bi-level storage. Mostly to stop stuff flying forward, but also building a shelf will help keep things stabilized. The Discovery has quite a bit of storage room, but it's mostly oriented vertically. I've packed almost to the roof before and, it's not cool. After a few miles off-road, shift happens.



    It would be too easy for things to fly over the seat and hit my kids. Some people rely on the factory tie-down points in the Discovery to secure their load, but they are simply weld-nuts welded to the 20 gauge sheet metal floor. The tie down points are the rear are a little better than those at the front, as they weld nuts are attached to two layers of sheet metal, and also near a stout crossmember. The forward points utilize only a single layer of sheet metal.

    Some people with Land Rovers buy the Dog Guard accessory from Land Rover. But looking at how it's attached, I wans't happy with that. Just like the cargo tie-down points, it will stop things moving forward under braking, but certainly not in a collision. I wanted something better, something more like what professionals use in a plumber's van or the like.

    The first order of business was the forward bulkhead. I'm building it with roll-cage specs in mind, because hopefully if the truck is ever upside down, it will help protect the kids, or worst case, won't collapse and make the situation worse. 2" square 1/8" wall tube. Here you can see it with my 4x4" mounting plates, and there's a sandwhich plate under the floor. This turned out to be a really weak connection, as the floor of the truck is really flimsy (relatively speaking). So I made a doubler plate out of 6"x12" 1/4" steel, and the sandwhich plate on the bottom is now 5x10". Now it's really solid.



    This will have 2" square mesh applied to it. Next, I built a cargo shelf support frame. The height of this will match the height of the top of the cubby boxes on the sides.



    Next, I added backstays which bolt to the factory 3rd row headrest mounting points.



    2 6mm bolts each side, which I don't think will be enough. I'll probably end up welding the feet to the structure. This will be a bolted connection between the tubes here.



    It was very hard to get the cage back out to finish welding and paint. Hopefully it goes back in OK
    Last edited by R_Lefebvre; 05-20-2011 at 07:12 AM.

  2. #2
    OLC Member R_Lefebvre's Avatar
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    When I originally took the carpeting out, I saw how the floor was quite uneven, and in particular there were these large stamped steel parts spot welded to floor. These were supposed to be used for the 3rd row seats in the Disco, and option I never had. Seeing how this would mess up my plans for a bedlined plywood floor in the back, I decided to build drawers instead. I even bought the 400lb rated drawer sliders to do it.

    But I was never really happy with the plan. Drawers are great for many reasons. Biggest one is easy access to things at the back. But they are also space and weight inefficient. I'd lose about 6" of width across the back just from the structure. And they'd probably weigh another 50-100lb empty.

    Well, I decided not to build drawers, this will just be a shelf and the barrier. So I removed those "bumps" from the floor. I originally tried to cold-chisel the stampings off from the floor, but quickly found the spot welds would not tear, and the floor was tearing instead. So, I had to carefully drill the spot welds out.



    Then, using a cold chisel, remove the metal. I have a few new holes in the floor, but given how many are there already, no big deal. Just seal them up.

    Last edited by R_Lefebvre; 05-20-2011 at 07:06 AM.

  3. #3
    OLC Member MatS's Avatar
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    That's starting to look pretty cool, nice work so far.

  4. #4
    OLC Member ol yeller's Avatar
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    yup I can relate to stuff flying around in the cabin, I ended up building a rack to attach the jack axe etc. to and get it all away from the kids soon after we started doing our trips out.

    Looks like those back-stays would be fine just bolted in? There are many lighter options than plywood but all spendy...keep us posted..

  5. #5
    OLC Member R_Lefebvre's Avatar
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    Only worked on it for one afternoon. I had to weld each individual wire to get it to stop rattling. It's surprisingly quiet now. It's ready for paint.




  6. #6
    OLC Member Root Moose's Avatar
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    I've considered making something similar for the back of my XJ.

    Neat idea to tie into the rear upper head rest mounts. In an XJ the restraint hooks for kids car seats bolt in a similar location, using a 8 - 10 mm bolt IIRC. Could do something similar there. I was thinking of doing a triangulated bar kind of like an old CJ7 roll bar but maybe I don't have to be space inefficient if I copy your idea.

    With the XJ the rear bench does not have head restraints which really bugs me (scouring yards looking for the parts to add them). I have a cargo net in big blue right now. I probably don't need the steel mesh - I'm more interested in cargo stacking and roll over protection (and to be truthful I think the cargo net looks cool ).

    I'm not a fan of the drawers either. I have that setup in my white XJ (bought it that way) and it does not impress. I'd rather have a shelf setup with totes that can be pulled out. Then you can just take the tote full of whatever and go on with it to where it needs to be instead of moving the vehicle in that scenario. We used to do that in the old LWB SJ413 and liked it.

  7. #7
    OLC Member Root Moose's Avatar
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    Btw, what did you use to bend the tubing?

  8. #8
    OLC Member R_Lefebvre's Avatar
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    I didn't bend the tubing, those are weld-in elbows from QuickFab, a Canadian company. Pretty cool. I used them on my roof-rack too. Probably not as strong as a bend, but you'd never get that radius bend, unless you had a true mandrel bender, and even then... They're very tight.

    Yeah, if there are child restraints, chances are the mount point is pretty stout. I can have somebody check the CMVSS requirements, might be 3000lbs but I'm not sure. I'm sort of relying on those points, plus the shelf structure, and even the back of the seats to stop the hoop from moving. I even thought about tying in another point, there's mounts just below my alpine windows where the Genuine Dog Guard mounts to, or I could pick up the seat belt mounting points on the C-pillar, etc. But at some point you have to call it good enough.

  9. #9
    OLC Member Landy_Andy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R_Lefebvre View Post
    I didn't bend the tubing, those are weld-in elbows from QuickFab, a Canadian company. Pretty cool. I used them on my roof-rack too.
    Sweet.... was wondering about frames for some tables I need for our basement suite. More welding projects added to the list.... can't abide working in wood

    Wonder if I could convince the wife I need a TIG plant to make them.......

  10. #10
    OLC Member R_Lefebvre's Avatar
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    Yeah, and they're located out your way as well. With the TIG, you can't even tell it's not one single piece. It's a nice option for non-mission-critical corners.

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